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Style concepts for the Flowgame I’m currently working on for Spilgames I needed to create a style and find a fun theme for a new flow styled game, suiting for women. I experimented with styles that were very simple to more detailed styles. I also would have loved to work with an isometric perspective, but since the game should also be playable on smartphones, the grid needed to stay as big as possible. I hope to use something like this in the future though. The Zibbo portal chose for the dragon theme, which I iterated later in the art process.

Concept art I made for The Dragon Flow In the post after this one, I’ve also shown the concept art that happend before this style. The Dragonflow is a flowgame aimed for Zibbo.com, a gameportal that focusses on women aged 30 to 50. So I tried to create an original style that is fun for these ladies. The Dragonflow will be released in April 2014

30 minute speedpaints (photoshop, wacom intuos)

Pocketlight stories, an Illustration for Control Online

Pocketlight stories, an Illustration for Control Online

Live painting session for an Etos event.Frank E Hollywood and I had to paint with nothing more but make up this time! 

Live painting session for an Etos event.
Frank E Hollywood and I had to paint with nothing more but make up this time! 

Live painting session in a church in Eindhoven.Together with Frank E Hollywood I’ve painted a chesterfield couch 

Live painting session in a church in Eindhoven.
Together with Frank E Hollywood I’ve painted a chesterfield couch 

Work for Dreams of Danu

Hattat is a game I made together with Saskia Freeke, Emre Canbazoglu and Can in 48 hours, during the Cultures at Play gamejam in Istanbul, december 2011. We’ve done a friendly competition against 2 other ‘international’ teams (The Dutch, Germans, French and Turks were all mixed in teams) (we won).

We had to buy an artifact on the Grand Bazar and use that artifact as inspiration for our game. We’ve bought a calligraphic piece made by an artist on the Grand Bazar. We loved how he was working, very focused and absorbed into his painting. We wanted to put this tranquility into our game and we wanted to use the action of drawing a calligraphic painting (which is called Hattat in Turkish). 

So we came up with a simple maze game, which you can play with your mouse or trackpad. But the best way to play it was with a Wacom pen, because that best simulates the gameplay. You have to find the golden leaf in the maze by drawing a line to explore your path, only problem is that you can only see that much around you. If you hit a wall (the maze itself is a calligraphic painting), you will spill inkt splatters on your painting. So you have to be careful, take your time and focus. Eventually you will be absorbed in the gameplay, experiencing the same flow as a calligraphic drawer, only with some challenge on your hands.

There are few things young children love more than silly things. We recognised this and created our toy, Nonsense, to kindle their enjoyment of silliness.

Nonsense revels in the whimsy, the strange and even a little bit in the naughty. It is a set of blocks that play both words and sounds, but with a twist. Kids can arrange them in different ways to change the toy’s response and can even create games of their own to play with the blocks.

Every block features a picture to hint at the sort of sounds it will contain. The sounds aren’t all straightforward, however, and are guaranteed to pleasantly surprise anyone listening.  Every sound has been designed to spur on the imagination, to delight and to surprise. The words contained in each block are always part of a sentence so that it is possible to create short stories, but also to create complete and utter nonsense, hence the name!

So how does it work? When the start-block (or rather the star block) is lined up with another block they detect one another. Then, when the irresistable red button is pressed the blocks make their presence known by sounding out after one another. Each one plays their words first (e.g. “the car”), followed by a small collection of sounds (e.g. a car honking followed by it speeding away). When a block is rotated it plays the same words but different sounds, so children have a large number of them at their disposal.

This proof of concept video (showing the Dutch version of the toy) demonstrates how the final product will work.

The blocks work both when they are close to each other and at a short distance from another. This means kids can play with them in all kinds of ways other than the ones shown in this video, such as placing them in a long row throughout a room. The full set was designed to support the many diferent ways children can play with one another.

Nonsense was designed by Team Magic Bean, a multi-disciplinary group of students of the Utrecht School of Arts at the Art and Technology faculty in Hilversum, the Netherlands.
The project Nonsense is a result of was mainly intended as a research project. A large amount of research and testing went into the design, the artwork, the sound and the physical prototype to make this toy as appealing as possible to the target audience.

During tests we found that children around the age of 6 love nonsensical things. Nonsense was designed as a tool for playing with this nonsense and with language as a whole without undermining the language learning process.
The toy is designed to spur on the imagination and is intended to be played with by a group of 4 6-year-olds.

Nonsense was designed and developed by the following people:
Bas Dabroek – Play Designer
Saskia Freeke – Project Leader
Samantha Geurts – Play Designer
Arne Höfer – Sound Leader
Patrick Kersten – Technical Leader
Julien Mier – Sound Designer
Christiaan Ribbens – Play Designer
Edwin Rietmeijer - Sound Designer
Sonja van Vuure – Visual Design Leader

Style concepts for the Flowgame I’m currently working on for Spilgames I needed to create a style and find a fun theme for a new flow styled game, suiting for women. I experimented with styles that were very simple to more detailed styles. I also would have loved to work with an isometric perspective, but since the game should also be playable on smartphones, the grid needed to stay as big as possible. I hope to use something like this in the future though. The Zibbo portal chose for the dragon theme, which I iterated later in the art process.

Concept art I made for The Dragon Flow In the post after this one, I’ve also shown the concept art that happend before this style. The Dragonflow is a flowgame aimed for Zibbo.com, a gameportal that focusses on women aged 30 to 50. So I tried to create an original style that is fun for these ladies. The Dragonflow will be released in April 2014

30 minute speedpaints (photoshop, wacom intuos)

Pocketlight stories, an Illustration for Control Online

Pocketlight stories, an Illustration for Control Online

Live painting session for an Etos event.Frank E Hollywood and I had to paint with nothing more but make up this time! 

Live painting session for an Etos event.
Frank E Hollywood and I had to paint with nothing more but make up this time! 

Live painting session in a church in Eindhoven.Together with Frank E Hollywood I’ve painted a chesterfield couch 

Live painting session in a church in Eindhoven.
Together with Frank E Hollywood I’ve painted a chesterfield couch 

Work for Dreams of Danu

Hattat is a game I made together with Saskia Freeke, Emre Canbazoglu and Can in 48 hours, during the Cultures at Play gamejam in Istanbul, december 2011. We’ve done a friendly competition against 2 other ‘international’ teams (The Dutch, Germans, French and Turks were all mixed in teams) (we won).

We had to buy an artifact on the Grand Bazar and use that artifact as inspiration for our game. We’ve bought a calligraphic piece made by an artist on the Grand Bazar. We loved how he was working, very focused and absorbed into his painting. We wanted to put this tranquility into our game and we wanted to use the action of drawing a calligraphic painting (which is called Hattat in Turkish). 

So we came up with a simple maze game, which you can play with your mouse or trackpad. But the best way to play it was with a Wacom pen, because that best simulates the gameplay. You have to find the golden leaf in the maze by drawing a line to explore your path, only problem is that you can only see that much around you. If you hit a wall (the maze itself is a calligraphic painting), you will spill inkt splatters on your painting. So you have to be careful, take your time and focus. Eventually you will be absorbed in the gameplay, experiencing the same flow as a calligraphic drawer, only with some challenge on your hands.

There are few things young children love more than silly things. We recognised this and created our toy, Nonsense, to kindle their enjoyment of silliness.

Nonsense revels in the whimsy, the strange and even a little bit in the naughty. It is a set of blocks that play both words and sounds, but with a twist. Kids can arrange them in different ways to change the toy’s response and can even create games of their own to play with the blocks.

Every block features a picture to hint at the sort of sounds it will contain. The sounds aren’t all straightforward, however, and are guaranteed to pleasantly surprise anyone listening.  Every sound has been designed to spur on the imagination, to delight and to surprise. The words contained in each block are always part of a sentence so that it is possible to create short stories, but also to create complete and utter nonsense, hence the name!

So how does it work? When the start-block (or rather the star block) is lined up with another block they detect one another. Then, when the irresistable red button is pressed the blocks make their presence known by sounding out after one another. Each one plays their words first (e.g. “the car”), followed by a small collection of sounds (e.g. a car honking followed by it speeding away). When a block is rotated it plays the same words but different sounds, so children have a large number of them at their disposal.

This proof of concept video (showing the Dutch version of the toy) demonstrates how the final product will work.

The blocks work both when they are close to each other and at a short distance from another. This means kids can play with them in all kinds of ways other than the ones shown in this video, such as placing them in a long row throughout a room. The full set was designed to support the many diferent ways children can play with one another.

Nonsense was designed by Team Magic Bean, a multi-disciplinary group of students of the Utrecht School of Arts at the Art and Technology faculty in Hilversum, the Netherlands.
The project Nonsense is a result of was mainly intended as a research project. A large amount of research and testing went into the design, the artwork, the sound and the physical prototype to make this toy as appealing as possible to the target audience.

During tests we found that children around the age of 6 love nonsensical things. Nonsense was designed as a tool for playing with this nonsense and with language as a whole without undermining the language learning process.
The toy is designed to spur on the imagination and is intended to be played with by a group of 4 6-year-olds.

Nonsense was designed and developed by the following people:
Bas Dabroek – Play Designer
Saskia Freeke – Project Leader
Samantha Geurts – Play Designer
Arne Höfer – Sound Leader
Patrick Kersten – Technical Leader
Julien Mier – Sound Designer
Christiaan Ribbens – Play Designer
Edwin Rietmeijer - Sound Designer
Sonja van Vuure – Visual Design Leader

About:

Hello, I'm Sonja van Vuure, Game Artist, Illustrator and Designer.
Prepare yourself for artwork, experimentations, games and installations!

I'm open for commissions

contact: sonjavanvuure@gmail.com